Archive for September, 2018

I Can Go Alone and Have a Good Time

September 17, 2018

I eat alone at restaurants all the time. I rarely go to upscale places, so I don’t know if I’d feel as comfortable at those places. Whenever I go into Flagstaff, I try to plan it around lunch or dinner. I do cook, but I’d rather not. I usually eat at Oscar’s Burrito Fiesta, Your Pie, Fratelli’s pizza or Taverna.

Last Wednesday night, the Sedona Film Festival was showing The Cakemaker at the Flagstaff Harkins. They bring up independent films once a month. I couldn’t get anyone interested in going with me, so I went alone. It was a terrific movie and I’m glad I went. The problem is that the movie had an open ending. Viewers had to decide how it worked out. I do wish someone had gone with me, so I could discuss it. I did encounter a woman in the Ladies Room who gave me her take on the ending, which was opposite from mine.

On Saturday, Flagstaff sponsored The Big Sing in Heritage Square. Again, no one was interested, so I went by myself. I parked on San Francisco Street, north of Cherry Street so I wouldn’t have to pay. As I walked down the steep hill, I thought about the effort it was going to take to go back up the hill.

I ate lunch at Criollo Latin Kitchen, a restaurant I’d wanted to try all summer as it got rave reviews in Phoenix Magazine. I sat at a high top table by myself but didn’t bother to notice if anyone else was dining solo. I ordered the salmon tostado, which was Eggs Benedict with mounds of flaked salmon on English muffins with spinach and a lightly spicy Hollandaise sauce. It was delicious!

After a leisurely meal, I ambled over to Heritage Square and snagged a seat in the shade on a low wall. It was a bit toasty out, so I appreciated the bottled water that was given out, gratis.

The concert was a sing-along with eight choruses from the Flagstaff area. Each one sang two songs. The NAU chorus started the program out with The Star Spangled Banner and then went into Dancin’ in the Street. I was not at all embarrassed to sing along.

One group, the Flagstaff Threshold Choir, was a cappella. They sing for free in people’s homes, hospitals and hospices to celebrate the thresholds of life: births, deaths, illnesses and celebrations. They taught the audience two rounds to sing. It was very moving.

I stayed for six groups, until I got quite hot. I crossed over and had a triple chocolate gelato at The Sweet Shoppe. I revived enough to tackle the hill to my car.

I don’t go to events solo as often when I’m in Scottsdale. I’m not sure why, but I think I’ll make more of an effort to do when my friends aren’t interested.

 

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Where is it?

September 4, 2018

I misplace my phone often:  in the car, under the newspaper, under the quilt on my bed. I used to have a landline, so I could call my phone, but I cut off that service in a money-saving effort. I do have a “Where’s my iPhone?” app, but I don’t have any other Apple devices, so that app doesn’t work.

Previously, when I’d lost my phone, I’d go to neighbors and ask them to call my phone. This was cumbersome but effective. Last fall I found out about The Tile. It’s a small device to put on a key ring. If you lose your keys, you open the app on the phone and it will make the tile beep, so you can find your keys. Even better, if you misplace your phone, you can tap twice on the tile, and it will ring your phone, even it’s on mute or vibrate. (It won’t work if the phone is completely turned off.) This device has saved me oodles of time.

When I was growing up, I remember that my mother was constantly losing her purse or keys. This was decades before she suffered from dementia. She had so much on her mind all the time that she never noted where she put the keys or her purse. My father was her “Tile.” He would find her phone or purse for her. He bought several devices, from the ads on the back pages of the New York Times Magazine, but none worked well enough to find her purse or keys.

And it’s not only my phone I misplace. Every year there are at least four or five items that I misplace between the cabin and my condo in Scottsdale. Currently, I’m at a loss as the whereabouts of the second set of flannel sheets and the sweaters, turtlenecks and winter nightgowns that I stored with them. I looked in every white garbage bag, suitcase and container in my storage shed, but no luck. Louie, my dog, is not helpful in finding these things. This is one of the few instances when I wish I lived with someone who could remind me where I stored things.

The other thing that drives me nuts is looking for an object I’ve seen recently, like my passport or a prescription refill. I know it’s in my house somewhere, but I have no idea where. Sometimes this sends me into a frenzy. On occasion, I have found the item I’m looking for in the garbage.

That reminds me of when my older daughter, Emily, was twelve and lost her dental retainer for the second time. She told me when I arrived home from work. When I questioned her about the last time she’d remembered wearing it, she promptly said, “At lunch in the cafeteria, I put it in a napkin and put it on my tray.” By now, the school was closed for the day. I drove us to the back of the school where the dumpsters were. Luckily, they hadn’t been emptied. I made Emily get in the dumpster and look for her retainer. Miracle of miracles, she found it! Then she shoved it right back in her mouth. Yuck! I wanted her to bathe it in mouthwash before she put it in her mouth. She smiled and was happy that she’d saved me two hundred dollars.

I think I have a project for next April, when I open my cabin again. I’m going to take everything out of the storage shed and purge what I don’t need and organize the rest. Ah yes, next spring.